My Fave Red Doors in Parga

Our recent travels in Greece involved an eleven-day road trip from Athens to the Epirus region of northwestern Greece, down the southwestern coast of Peloponnese, across Messinia to our summer house on the coast of southeastern Peloponnese, and finally back to Athens. When in the Epirus region, we made our home base in the city of Ioannina and took day trips to the coastal town of Parga and to various mountain villages surrounding Ioannina.

Today, I’m sharing a few of my favorite red doors (and an eye-catching red taverna) from Parga.

Red Door in Parga LR

If you saw my Wordless Wednesday post yesterday, you’ve already seen the spicey red Lithos Taverna in the photo below. I’m showing it again because this arched red door with the blue motorcycle was just across the street from the taverna. Gotta love those hot reds.

Lithos Taverna in Parga L3

Up the hill from Lithos Taverna, I came across the striking red door of Hotel 1800, a small luxury hotel located in the center of town beneath the Venetian Castle of Parga.

Hotel 1800 Red Door

Below is a peek at the vibrant colors of Parga’s hillside homes. More to come in future posts about our visit to this bustling seaside town.

Parga L

About Parga:

Parga (Πάργα) is a seaside town located in the Epirus region of northwestern Greece. A popular tourist destination, Parga lies on the Ionian coast between the cities of Preveza and Igoumenitsa and is about a five-hour drive from Athens. The main attractions in the colorful town of Parga are a historical Venetian castle overlooking the town, a good variety of shops and tavernas, as well as, several beaches.

Inspiration: Thursday Doors.

12 thoughts on “My Fave Red Doors in Parga

  1. Only have been in the neighborhood of Athens, so is the culture (customs and peopele) different from the South of Greece?
    Can see why Parga is loved by tourists -so bright and inviting! Wow, these red doors are stunning. To fill you in Donna, this is my new blog, because I ran out of space at Artworks (so, Junieper is the same person as Jesh StG -needed to do that in the beginning, to remind myself on which blog I was:))

    1. Hi Jesh or should I address you as Junieper? Sorry to be slow in getting back to you. I’ve been away from my computer for a few days tending to our sick doggie. Thankfully, he’s doing better but is not up to full speed yet.
      I haven’t observed differences in the people living in the various regions of Greece. Greeks are kind, friendly, welcoming people. I have observed differences in things like how traditional foods are prepared or the styles of homes.
      Thanks for the update on your new blog. I’ve been trying to follow your new blog via WordPress but haven’t been able to do so. What is the name of your website and I’ll try to find you. Do you have a way to follow your blog via a WordPress button?
      Thanks for stopping by! Always a pleasure to chat with you.
      Donna

  2. Wow what a stunningly beautiful place that I had never heard of before. One of my favourite thing about our Thursday Doors group is all the things I learn each week. And you found some excellent doors too! Thanks for sharing this 🙂

  3. Beautiful non-traditional white painted town. But I suppose there is not a lot remains of that “tradition”. I pace it in inverted commas as that is the way Greece the look of Greece is portrayed

    1. Thanks, Abrie. Much of Greece is filled with the traditional white-washed houses with blue shutters and doors, especially on the islands. It’s a nice change to find colorful Venetian-influenced villages along the coasts of Greece and on some islands. Both styles are beautiful.
      Donna

  4. I absolutely love all of these, but I think my favorite is that first shot with the motorcycle. Of course the last shot of the town makes me want to pack up and head out immediately.

    janet

    1. Hi Janet, The blue motorcycle does add a nice accent to the red door. It’s hard to find a door in Greece without a motorcycle parked in front of it. 🙂 Parga is waiting for you!

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